Published for Foreign Policy Shadow Government, August 14, 2012

The dominant story line of the Ryan pick is probably the correct one: This focuses the national election on the Big Issue of the parties’ differing philosophies on how to fix America’s troubled economy. I have been struck by the zeal with which both sides have embraced the Ryan pick, each believing that it presents a golden opportunity to present the contrast between the two parties. Each team fervently believes the contrast favors their side, since each team fervently believes the American public will embrace their view, if only the view is presented clearly enough.

But does the Ryan pick have any implications for foreign policy, the bailiwick of Shadow Government? To answer that, I reviewed the most consequential Ryan speech on foreign policy, an address to the Hamilton Society (full disclosure: I am the faculty advisor to Duke’s chapter of the Hamilton Society and enthusiastically support its mission to provide informed debate on foreign-policy issues to college campuses).

The speech is well-worth listening to. Early on, Ryan offers a pithy summation that “our fiscal policy is on a collision course with our foreign policy.” He fully embraces the Republican critique that the crash is avoidable — that, because our political leaders keep kicking the fiscal can down the road, “we are choosing decline.” Such decline is not inevitable, nor is it desirable.

The Obama campaign is going to great lengths to paint Ryan’s political views as extreme. When it comes to foreign policy, I don’t think they will be able to do that. The worldview Ryan presents in the speech may bother some FP colleagues, but it is not an extreme or radical worldview. Or, to put the matter more sharply: It is definitely not an un-American view. Indeed, it is squarely within the bipartisan mainstream of American foreign-policy practitioners.

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